SNARE DRUM
 

 

Matched Grip

 

Study Guide

 

Quiz

 

 

 

Concert Snare Techniques - Playlist

Traditional Grip

Percussion Grips

Each instrument in the percussion family has its own unique grip and performance technique.

 

 

Timpani Grip:  Known as the French grip - thumbs up.

No double bounce on the timpani

Tambourine:

 

Study Guide for the Tambourine

 

Tambourine Quiz

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TRIANGLE

 

Study Guide

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Concert Bass Drum

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bass Drum Study Guide

 

 

Bass Drum Quiz

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

TAM TAM - Gong

 

Study Guide for Tam Tam

 

Quiz for Tam Tam

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

SUSPENDED CYMB

 

Study Guide for Sus Cymb

 

Quiz for Sus Cymb

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Crash Cymbals

 

Study Guide

 

Quiz

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CHIMES

MALLET INSTRUMENTS

 

4 Mallet Burton Grip  Click link for more info.

 

There are three main grips used by mallet players: Traditional crossed, Burton (which is a variation of traditional crossed), and Stevens-Musser. The traditional crossed grip is used almost solely by marimba players (such as Keiko Abe), but Stevens and Burton grips have found favor both among marimba and vibraphone players, thus making them the two most popular 4-mallet grips for percussionists in the United States.

 

There are advantages as well as disadvantages to both crossed-style (traditional and Burton) and Musser-Stevens. Crossed-style grips make learning basic mallet control easy and feel very stable. However, the interval can't be made as wide as with the Stevens grip and some say that rolls can't be made as well. With the Stevens grip, the mallets are more free to move more independently than in crossed-style grips, so it is possible to make much more subtle motions, ultimately resulting in a greater range of motion and mallet control. Despite these advantages of the Stevens grip, it is harder to master than crossed-style grips. Additionally, though the Stevens grip is intended to place minimal tension on the hand muscles, the mallets exert greater leverage when they are in motion (since they are held at the very ends), requiring greater muscle control than with crossed-style grips. People with arthritis or similar conditions may not be able to use the Musser-Stevens grip.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Stevens Grip

In the Stevens technique, the mallets are held loosely. The two outside mallets are gripped with the little and ring fingers; the inside mallets are cantilevered between the flesh of thepalm at the base of the thumb and the tip of the middle finger.

Video Lessons

  • Twitter Classic

FREEBERNMUSIC.COM